Superposition: physicists and artists in conversation

Bookings now open

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We are excited to announce that Superposition will be open to the public at the London Canal Museum on Thursday afternoons, Saturdays and Sundays from 24 August to 20 October 2013.

To see Superposition up close you will need to climb down two fixed ladders into the underground Victorian ice well. A guided tour to descend into the well will be available every 20 minutes. It is advisable that you book in advance, but places may also be available on the day. Please see our bookings page to make your booking and to find out more about visiting the London Canal Museum.

 

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Packing, transporting and installing!

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Pretty much re the packing of discs; each will be labeled and packed in order, so they’ll be easy to find in sequence when installing. There’ll be a lot of boxes; about 35 roughly the size of an archival box. By the time I finish they’ll form a rather large wall running down the middle of my small office! It’ll take a day to install the framework, a day, possibly two to hang the discs and up to two days to do the lighting.

Yes re catching up with Dale and Michael from M&M Welding Fabrication Ltd; they’ve been great to work with. The metal frame, which consists of 6 concentric circles attached to a cross section will be made from aluminium and powder coated a gun-metal grey, will be suspended from the ceiling of the ice well. The discs will be linked to each other and the framework with brass rods. The outer concentric circle is 3 metres in diameter, the inner 1 metre.

 

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Bringing it all together

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Really good to see examples of all the materials - what a beautiful palette. So I am assuming that you will pack up all the discs/rods systematically so that each box can be transported and then opened sequentially to install in the well? How long is the installation process likely to take?

You met the engineering company last week - how did that go? Can you explain a bit more about how the metal frame supporting the discs will be designed and fitted?

Annabel Lucas, Curator

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Grids and concentric circles

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I’m doing most of the work myself, producing about 6 discs a day. I’ll have occasional help from Grace, another artist. She had her first day on Wednesday, cleaning brass rods with eucalyptus oil and cutting them into the necessary lengths, then sticking on numerous clear diamantes – I think she enjoyed herself!

The colours are blue (sky and turquoise), green (emerald), orange (bright and topaz) and red (ruby). The discs decorated with clear beads and diamantes are in concentric circle patterns, to represent the physical structure and aesthetic appearance of particle detectors; the colour discs will have grid patterns, to reflect one of the ways Ben analyses his research data. The rainbow colour spectrum is university employed to symbolize particle detection and activity in detectors – red being the highest intensity; blue the lowest. Here’s a photo of some of the materials I’m using, which gives a good sense of the colours.

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A spectrum of colour

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You have certainly got your work cut out Lyndall! Are you inviting anyone else to help create the discs or do you want to do all the work yourself?

Now that you have started the clear discs, I am sure you have a plan for tackling the other coloured discs - remind me of these colours, the pattern they will create and your rationale for selecting this 'palette' of beads and diamantes? A few weeks ago I remember you showing us samples of the colours you planned to use - there was a fresh sky blue, emerald green and a beautify, rich ruby red....

Are there any photographs to show the spectrum?

Annabel Lucas, Curator

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